java.util

Class Timer


public class Timer
extends Object

A facility for threads to schedule tasks for future execution in a background thread. Tasks may be scheduled for one-time execution, or for repeated execution at regular intervals.

Corresponding to each Timer object is a single background thread that is used to execute all of the timer's tasks, sequentially. Timer tasks should complete quickly. If a timer task takes excessive time to complete, it "hogs" the timer's task execution thread. This can, in turn, delay the execution of subsequent tasks, which may "bunch up" and execute in rapid succession when (and if) the offending task finally completes.

After the last live reference to a Timer object goes away and all outstanding tasks have completed execution, the timer's task execution thread terminates gracefully (and becomes subject to garbage collection). However, this can take arbitrarily long to occur. By default, the task execution thread does not run as a daemon thread, so it is capable of keeping an application from terminating. If a caller wants to terminate a timer's task execution thread rapidly, the caller should invoke the timer's cancel method.

If the timer's task execution thread terminates unexpectedly, for example, because its stop method is invoked, any further attempt to schedule a task on the timer will result in an IllegalStateException, as if the timer's cancel method had been invoked.

This class is thread-safe: multiple threads can share a single Timer object without the need for external synchronization.

This class does not offer real-time guarantees: it schedules tasks using the Object.wait(long) method.

Implementation note: This class scales to large numbers of concurrently scheduled tasks (thousands should present no problem). Internally, it uses a binary heap to represent its task queue, so the cost to schedule a task is O(log n), where n is the number of concurrently scheduled tasks.

Implementation note: All constructors start a timer thread.

Since:
1.3
See Also:
TimerTask, Object.wait(long)

Constructor Summary

Timer()
Creates a new timer.
Timer(boolean isDaemon)
Creates a new timer whose associated thread may be specified to run as a daemon.
Timer(String name)
Creates a new timer whose associated thread has the specified name.
Timer(String name, boolean isDaemon)
Creates a new timer whose associated thread has the specified name, and may be specified to run as a daemon.

Method Summary

void
cancel()
Terminates this timer, discarding any currently scheduled tasks.
int
purge()
Removes all cancelled tasks from this timer's task queue.
void
schedule(TimerTask task, Date time)
Schedules the specified task for execution at the specified time.
void
schedule(TimerTask task, Date firstTime, long period)
Schedules the specified task for repeated fixed-delay execution, beginning at the specified time.
void
schedule(TimerTask task, long delay)
Schedules the specified task for execution after the specified delay.
void
schedule(TimerTask task, long delay, long period)
Schedules the specified task for repeated fixed-delay execution, beginning after the specified delay.
void
scheduleAtFixedRate(TimerTask task, Date firstTime, long period)
Schedules the specified task for repeated fixed-rate execution, beginning at the specified time.
void
scheduleAtFixedRate(TimerTask task, long delay, long period)
Schedules the specified task for repeated fixed-rate execution, beginning after the specified delay.

Methods inherited from class java.lang.Object

clone, equals, extends Object> getClass, finalize, hashCode, notify, notifyAll, toString, wait, wait, wait

Constructor Details

Timer

public Timer()
Creates a new timer. The associated thread does not run as a daemon.
See Also:
Thread, cancel()
Usages and Demos :

View More Examples of Timer()
   1:   {
   2:     Timer timer = new Timer();
   3:     
   4:     timer.schedule( new Task(), 2000 );
   5:     

View Full Code Here
   1:   Services myCore;
   2:   public Timer(){ }
   3: 
   4:   public void setServices(Services cc){
   5:     myCore = cc;

View Full Code Here
   1:     public void start() {
   2:         timer = new Timer();
   3: 
   4:         timer.schedule(
   5:             new LocalTimerTask(),

View Full Code Here
   1: {
   2:    private static Timer timer = new Timer();
   3: 
   4:    public static void main(String []args)
   5:    {

View Full Code Here
   1:     private TimerUtil() {
   2:         timer = new Timer();
   3:     }
   4: 
   5:     public static synchronized TimerUtil getInstance() {

View Full Code Here

Timer

public Timer(boolean isDaemon)
Creates a new timer whose associated thread may be specified to run as a daemon. A daemon thread is called for if the timer will be used to schedule repeating "maintenance activities", which must be performed as long as the application is running, but should not prolong the lifetime of the application.
Parameters:
isDaemon - true if the associated thread should run as a daemon.
See Also:
Thread, cancel()
Usages and Demos :

View More Examples of Timer(boolean isDaemon)
   1:     public SimpleTimer(boolean isDaemon) {
   2:         TIMER = new Timer(isDaemon);
   3:     }
   4:     
   5:     public void schedule(final Runnable task, long delay, long period) 

View Full Code Here
   1:     protected Timer createTimer(boolean daemon) {
   2:         return new Timer(daemon);
   3:     }
   4: 

View Full Code Here
   1:         boolean isDaemon = true;
   2:         _scavenger = new Timer(isDaemon);
   3:         long delay = _scavengerPeriod
   4:                 + Math.round(Math.random() * _scavengerPeriod);
   5:         if (_log.isDebugEnabled())

View Full Code Here
   1:         subject.setTimers(new TreeSet(Arrays.asList(new Timer[] {
   2:             new Timer(millis + 3600000),
   3:         ...
   4:             new Timer(millis - 1000),
   5:         ...
   6:             new Timer(millis - 2000),
   7:         })));

View Full Code Here
   1:     public SimpleTimer(boolean isDaemon) {
   2:         TIMER = new Timer(isDaemon);
   3:     }
   4: 
   5:     public ScheduledFuture<?> schedule(Runnable command, long delay, TimeUnit unit) {

View Full Code Here

Timer

public Timer(String name)
Creates a new timer whose associated thread has the specified name. The associated thread does not run as a daemon.
Parameters:
name - the name of the associated thread
Throws:
NullPointerException - if name is null
Since:
1.5
Usages and Demos :

View More Examples of Timer(String name)
   1:     public SimpleTimer(boolean isDaemon) {
   2:         TIMER = new Timer(isDaemon);
   3:     }
   4:     
   5:     public void schedule(final Runnable task, long delay, long period) 

View Full Code Here
   1:     protected Timer createTimer(boolean daemon) {
   2:         return new Timer(daemon);
   3:     }
   4: 

View Full Code Here
   1:         boolean isDaemon = true;
   2:         _scavenger = new Timer(isDaemon);
   3:         long delay = _scavengerPeriod
   4:                 + Math.round(Math.random() * _scavengerPeriod);
   5:         if (_log.isDebugEnabled())

View Full Code Here
   1:         subject.setTimers(new TreeSet(Arrays.asList(new Timer[] {
   2:             new Timer(millis + 3600000),
   3:         ...
   4:             new Timer(millis - 1000),
   5:         ...
   6:             new Timer(millis - 2000),
   7:         })));

View Full Code Here
   1:     public SimpleTimer(boolean isDaemon) {
   2:         TIMER = new Timer(isDaemon);
   3:     }
   4: 
   5:     public ScheduledFuture<?> schedule(Runnable command, long delay, TimeUnit unit) {

View Full Code Here

Timer

public Timer(String name,
             boolean isDaemon)
Creates a new timer whose associated thread has the specified name, and may be specified to run as a daemon.
Parameters:
name - the name of the associated thread
isDaemon - true if the associated thread should run as a daemon
Throws:
NullPointerException - if name is null
Since:
1.5
Usages and Demos :

View More Examples of Timer(String name,boolean isDaemon)
   1:         assert java.awt.EventQueue.isDispatchThread();
   2:         timer = new Timer( interInvocationMilliseconds, runner );
   3:     }
   4: 

View Full Code Here
   1:        if (bFile) {
   2:           final Timer pollingTimer = new Timer("RoboticonPollingTimer", true);
   3:           pollingTimer.scheduleAtFixedRate(
   4:                 new TimerTask()
   5:                 {

View Full Code Here
   1:     button.setImage (smile);
   2:     final Timer timer = new Timer(shell, SWT.NONE);
   3:     final Board board = new Board (shell, SWT.NONE);
   4:     board.reset (ROWS + COLUMNS, ROWS, COLUMNS);
   5:     int count = board.getMineCount () - board.getGuessCount ();

View Full Code Here
   1:       LOG.debug("Starting the auto-save timer");
   2:       autoSaveTimer = new Timer("DoodleServerAutoSaveTimer", true);
   3:       autoSaveTimer.scheduleAtFixedRate(
   4:             new TimerTask()
   5:             {

View Full Code Here

Method Details

cancel

public void cancel()
Terminates this timer, discarding any currently scheduled tasks. Does not interfere with a currently executing task (if it exists). Once a timer has been terminated, its execution thread terminates gracefully, and no more tasks may be scheduled on it.

Note that calling this method from within the run method of a timer task that was invoked by this timer absolutely guarantees that the ongoing task execution is the last task execution that will ever be performed by this timer.

This method may be called repeatedly; the second and subsequent calls have no effect.

Usages and Demos :

View More Examples of cancel()
   1: import java.util.Date;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     private Timer timer;
   7:     private long time = 100000;
   8:         ...
   9:     public void stop() {
  10:         timer.cancel();
  11:     }

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.util.Date;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5:     private TimerUtil() {
   6:         timer = new Timer();
   7:     }
   8:         ...
   9:     public void cancel() {
  10:         timer.cancel();
  11:     }

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.lang.Thread;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5:     public static boolean stopped = false;
   6:     Timer timer;
   7: 
   8:     static public void main(String[] args)
   9:     {

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5:     int time;
   6:     Timer timer;
   7:     Component3D target;
   8:         ...
   9:             } else if (me.isEntered() == false) {
  10:                 timer.cancel();
  11:           

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.io.InputStream;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5: public class FUTURE_MonitoredBufferedInputStream extends BufferedInputStream {
   6:     private Timer timer = new Timer();
   7:     public FUTURE_MonitoredBufferedInputStream(InputStream inputStream,
   8:         ...
   9:     public void close() throws IOException {
  10:         timer.cancel();
  11:         super.close();

View Full Code Here

purge

public int purge()
Removes all cancelled tasks from this timer's task queue. Calling this method has no effect on the behavior of the timer, but eliminates the references to the cancelled tasks from the queue. If there are no external references to these tasks, they become eligible for garbage collection.

Most programs will have no need to call this method. It is designed for use by the rare application that cancels a large number of tasks. Calling this method trades time for space: the runtime of the method may be proportional to n + c log n, where n is the number of tasks in the queue and c is the number of cancelled tasks.

Note that it is permissible to call this method from within a a task scheduled on this timer.

Returns:
the number of tasks removed from the queue.
Since:
1.5
Usages and Demos :

View More Examples of purge()
   1:     private static Random rand = new Random(System.currentTimeMillis());
   2:     private Timer timer = null;
   3: 
   4:         ...
   5:             SocketInitializationTask task = new SocketInitializationTask();
   6:             timer = new Timer("Socket initializer timer");
   7:             timer.schedule(task, delay, period);
   8:         ...
   9:             timer.cancel();
  10:             timer.purge();
  11:             if (!isSuccessfull())
  12:         ...
  13:             timer.cancel();
  14:             timer.purge();

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.util.Map;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: 
   4:         ...
   5:     private Map<String, SourceSequence> sourceSequences;
   6:     private Timer timer = new Timer();
   7: 
   8:         ...
   9:         
  10:         timer.purge();
  11:         

View Full Code Here
   1:  
   2:     protected Timer timer;
   3:     
   4:         ...
   5:         
   6:         if (timer == null){ 
   7:             timer = Switch.getSwitch().getTimer();
   8:         ...
   9:        if (timer != null){
  10:         timer.purge();
  11:        }

View Full Code Here

schedule

public void schedule(TimerTask task,
                     Date time)
Schedules the specified task for execution at the specified time. If the time is in the past, the task is scheduled for immediate execution.
Parameters:
task - task to be scheduled.
time - time at which task is to be executed.
Throws:
IllegalArgumentException - if time.getTime() is negative.
IllegalStateException - if task was already scheduled or cancelled, timer was cancelled, or timer thread terminated.
Usages and Demos :

View More Examples of schedule(TimerTask task,Date time)
   1:         };
   2:         java.util.Timer timer = new java.util.Timer();
   3:         ...
   4:         timer.schedule(t, 2000);
   5:     }
   6: 
   7:     public InputVerifier getDelegate() {

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.awt.event.MouseEvent;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5:     private KongaTree      m_tree;
   6:     private Timer          m_timer;
   7:     private IKongaTreeNode m_currentNode;
   8:         ...
   9:         cancel();
  10:         m_timer = new Timer();
  11:         m_currentNode = node;
  12:         ...
  13:                 };
  14:                 m_timer.schedule(task2, 750);

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.util.List;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: 
   4:         ...
   5:     private IndexManager indexManager;
   6:     private Timer timer;
   7: 
   8:         ...
   9:         DeleteIndexTask task = new DeleteIndexTask(indexManager, base);
  10:         timer.schedule(task, delay);
  11:     }
  12:         ...
  13:         UpdateIssueIndexTask task = new UpdateIssueIndexTask(indexManager, issue, operation);
  14:         timer.schedule(task, delay);

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     Timer timeoutTimer;
   7: 
   8:         ...
   9:         if (timeoutTimer  == null) {
  10:             timeoutTimer = new Timer();
  11:         }
  12:         ...
  13:         timerTask = new TimeoutTask();
  14:         timeoutTimer.schedule(timerTask, 2000);

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.util.ArrayList;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: 
   4:         ...
   5:   private Queue waitQueue;
   6:   private Timer queueTimer = new Timer();
   7:   private ArrayList vendors;
   8:         ...
   9:     else
  10:       queueTimer.schedule(task,QUEUE_TIMER_TIMEOUT);
  11:   }

View Full Code Here

schedule

public void schedule(TimerTask task,
                     Date firstTime,
                     long period)
Schedules the specified task for repeated fixed-delay execution, beginning at the specified time. Subsequent executions take place at approximately regular intervals, separated by the specified period.

In fixed-delay execution, each execution is scheduled relative to the actual execution time of the previous execution. If an execution is delayed for any reason (such as garbage collection or other background activity), subsequent executions will be delayed as well. In the long run, the frequency of execution will generally be slightly lower than the reciprocal of the specified period (assuming the system clock underlying Object.wait(long) is accurate).

Fixed-delay execution is appropriate for recurring activities that require "smoothness." In other words, it is appropriate for activities where it is more important to keep the frequency accurate in the short run than in the long run. This includes most animation tasks, such as blinking a cursor at regular intervals. It also includes tasks wherein regular activity is performed in response to human input, such as automatically repeating a character as long as a key is held down.

Parameters:
task - task to be scheduled.
firstTime - First time at which task is to be executed.
period - time in milliseconds between successive task executions.
Throws:
IllegalArgumentException - if time.getTime() is negative.
IllegalStateException - if task was already scheduled or cancelled, timer was cancelled, or timer thread terminated.
Usages and Demos :

View More Examples of schedule(TimerTask task,Date firstTime,long period)
   1:     SystemInfoDemo demo = new SystemInfoDemo();
   2:     Timer timer = new java.util.Timer();
   3:     
   4:         ...
   5:     timer.schedule(demo, 0, 1000);
   6:   }
   7: }

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2:     Timer       t      = new Timer();
   3:     QuoteClient client = new QuoteClient();
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     t.schedule(client, 10000, 20000);
   7:   }
   8: }

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2:     Timer       t      = new Timer();
   3:     QuoteClient client = new QuoteClient();
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     t.schedule(client, 10000, 20000);
   7:   }
   8: }

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2:     Timer             t      = new Timer();
   3:     MarketMakerClient client = new MarketMakerClient();
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     t.schedule(client, 5000, 5000);
   7:   }
   8: }

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2:     Timer             t      = new Timer();
   3:     MarketMakerClient client = new MarketMakerClient();
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     t.schedule(client, 5000, 5000);
   7:   }
   8: }

View Full Code Here

schedule

public void schedule(TimerTask task,
                     long delay)
Schedules the specified task for execution after the specified delay.
Parameters:
task - task to be scheduled.
delay - delay in milliseconds before task is to be executed.
Throws:
IllegalArgumentException - if delay is negative, or delay + System.currentTimeMillis() is negative.
IllegalStateException - if task was already scheduled or cancelled, or timer was cancelled.
Usages and Demos :

View More Examples of schedule(TimerTask task,long delay)
   1:         };
   2:         java.util.Timer timer = new java.util.Timer();
   3:         ...
   4:         timer.schedule(t, 2000);
   5:     }
   6: 
   7:     public InputVerifier getDelegate() {

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.awt.event.MouseEvent;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5:     private KongaTree      m_tree;
   6:     private Timer          m_timer;
   7:     private IKongaTreeNode m_currentNode;
   8:         ...
   9:         cancel();
  10:         m_timer = new Timer();
  11:         m_currentNode = node;
  12:         ...
  13:                 };
  14:                 m_timer.schedule(task2, 750);

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.util.List;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: 
   4:         ...
   5:     private IndexManager indexManager;
   6:     private Timer timer;
   7: 
   8:         ...
   9:         DeleteIndexTask task = new DeleteIndexTask(indexManager, base);
  10:         timer.schedule(task, delay);
  11:     }
  12:         ...
  13:         UpdateIssueIndexTask task = new UpdateIssueIndexTask(indexManager, issue, operation);
  14:         timer.schedule(task, delay);

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     Timer timeoutTimer;
   7: 
   8:         ...
   9:         if (timeoutTimer  == null) {
  10:             timeoutTimer = new Timer();
  11:         }
  12:         ...
  13:         timerTask = new TimeoutTask();
  14:         timeoutTimer.schedule(timerTask, 2000);

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.util.ArrayList;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: 
   4:         ...
   5:   private Queue waitQueue;
   6:   private Timer queueTimer = new Timer();
   7:   private ArrayList vendors;
   8:         ...
   9:     else
  10:       queueTimer.schedule(task,QUEUE_TIMER_TIMEOUT);
  11:   }

View Full Code Here

schedule

public void schedule(TimerTask task,
                     long delay,
                     long period)
Schedules the specified task for repeated fixed-delay execution, beginning after the specified delay. Subsequent executions take place at approximately regular intervals separated by the specified period.

In fixed-delay execution, each execution is scheduled relative to the actual execution time of the previous execution. If an execution is delayed for any reason (such as garbage collection or other background activity), subsequent executions will be delayed as well. In the long run, the frequency of execution will generally be slightly lower than the reciprocal of the specified period (assuming the system clock underlying Object.wait(long) is accurate).

Fixed-delay execution is appropriate for recurring activities that require "smoothness." In other words, it is appropriate for activities where it is more important to keep the frequency accurate in the short run than in the long run. This includes most animation tasks, such as blinking a cursor at regular intervals. It also includes tasks wherein regular activity is performed in response to human input, such as automatically repeating a character as long as a key is held down.

Parameters:
task - task to be scheduled.
delay - delay in milliseconds before task is to be executed.
period - time in milliseconds between successive task executions.
Throws:
IllegalArgumentException - if delay is negative, or delay + System.currentTimeMillis() is negative.
IllegalStateException - if task was already scheduled or cancelled, timer was cancelled, or timer thread terminated.
Usages and Demos :

View More Examples of schedule(TimerTask task,long delay,long period)
   1:     SystemInfoDemo demo = new SystemInfoDemo();
   2:     Timer timer = new java.util.Timer();
   3:     
   4:         ...
   5:     timer.schedule(demo, 0, 1000);
   6:   }
   7: }

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2:     Timer       t      = new Timer();
   3:     QuoteClient client = new QuoteClient();
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     t.schedule(client, 10000, 20000);
   7:   }
   8: }

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2:     Timer       t      = new Timer();
   3:     QuoteClient client = new QuoteClient();
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     t.schedule(client, 10000, 20000);
   7:   }
   8: }

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2:     Timer             t      = new Timer();
   3:     MarketMakerClient client = new MarketMakerClient();
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     t.schedule(client, 5000, 5000);
   7:   }
   8: }

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2:     Timer             t      = new Timer();
   3:     MarketMakerClient client = new MarketMakerClient();
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     t.schedule(client, 5000, 5000);
   7:   }
   8: }

View Full Code Here

scheduleAtFixedRate

public void scheduleAtFixedRate(TimerTask task,
                                Date firstTime,
                                long period)
Schedules the specified task for repeated fixed-rate execution, beginning at the specified time. Subsequent executions take place at approximately regular intervals, separated by the specified period.

In fixed-rate execution, each execution is scheduled relative to the scheduled execution time of the initial execution. If an execution is delayed for any reason (such as garbage collection or other background activity), two or more executions will occur in rapid succession to "catch up." In the long run, the frequency of execution will be exactly the reciprocal of the specified period (assuming the system clock underlying Object.wait(long) is accurate).

Fixed-rate execution is appropriate for recurring activities that are sensitive to absolute time, such as ringing a chime every hour on the hour, or running scheduled maintenance every day at a particular time. It is also appropriate for recurring activities where the total time to perform a fixed number of executions is important, such as a countdown timer that ticks once every second for ten seconds. Finally, fixed-rate execution is appropriate for scheduling multiple repeating timer tasks that must remain synchronized with respect to one another.

Parameters:
task - task to be scheduled.
firstTime - First time at which task is to be executed.
period - time in milliseconds between successive task executions.
Throws:
IllegalArgumentException - if time.getTime() is negative.
IllegalStateException - if task was already scheduled or cancelled, timer was cancelled, or timer thread terminated.
Usages and Demos :

View More Examples of scheduleAtFixedRate(TimerTask task,Date firstTime,long period)
   1: package org.gridlab.gridsphere.services.core.timer.impl;
   2: 
   3:         ...
   4: import org.gridlab.gridsphere.portlet.service.spi.PortletServiceProvider;
   5: import org.gridlab.gridsphere.services.core.timer.TimerService;
   6: 
   7:         ...
   8:         while (timerIter.hasNext()) {
   9:             Timer timer = (Timer) timerIter.next();
  10:             timer.cancel();
  11:         ...
  12:         }
  13:         timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(task, delay, period);

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5:       {
   6:          Timer t = new Timer();
   7:          Send10Notifies task = new Send10Notifies();
   8:         ...
   9:          t.scheduleAtFixedRate(task, 0, 1000);
  10:       }

View Full Code Here
   1:         MulticastWatcher mw = new MulticastWatcher(args);
   2:         Timer timer = new Timer(true);
   3:         ...
   4:         timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(mw, 1000, 1000);
   5:         mw.watch();
   6: 
   7:   }

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.util.Date;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     private Timer daemon = null;
   7: 
   8:         ...
   9:         {
  10:             daemon = new Timer( true );
  11:         }
  12:         ...
  13: 
  14:         daemon.scheduleAtFixedRate( runnable, startTime, DAILY_INTERVAL );

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.util.StringTokenizer;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5:         try {
   6:               String timer = aConfigEntry.getProperty(AzureusConfigConstants.UPDATE_TIMER);
   7:         ...
   8:               StringTokenizer tokenizer = new StringTokenizer(timer, ":");
   9:               long hours = Long.valueOf(tokenizer.nextToken()).longValue();
  10:         ...
  11:       };
  12:       timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(task, aPeriod, aPeriod);

View Full Code Here

scheduleAtFixedRate

public void scheduleAtFixedRate(TimerTask task,
                                long delay,
                                long period)
Schedules the specified task for repeated fixed-rate execution, beginning after the specified delay. Subsequent executions take place at approximately regular intervals, separated by the specified period.

In fixed-rate execution, each execution is scheduled relative to the scheduled execution time of the initial execution. If an execution is delayed for any reason (such as garbage collection or other background activity), two or more executions will occur in rapid succession to "catch up." In the long run, the frequency of execution will be exactly the reciprocal of the specified period (assuming the system clock underlying Object.wait(long) is accurate).

Fixed-rate execution is appropriate for recurring activities that are sensitive to absolute time, such as ringing a chime every hour on the hour, or running scheduled maintenance every day at a particular time. It is also appropriate for recurring activities where the total time to perform a fixed number of executions is important, such as a countdown timer that ticks once every second for ten seconds. Finally, fixed-rate execution is appropriate for scheduling multiple repeating timer tasks that must remain synchronized with respect to one another.

Parameters:
task - task to be scheduled.
delay - delay in milliseconds before task is to be executed.
period - time in milliseconds between successive task executions.
Throws:
IllegalArgumentException - if delay is negative, or delay + System.currentTimeMillis() is negative.
IllegalStateException - if task was already scheduled or cancelled, timer was cancelled, or timer thread terminated.
Usages and Demos :

View More Examples of scheduleAtFixedRate(TimerTask task,long delay,long period)
   1: package org.gridlab.gridsphere.services.core.timer.impl;
   2: 
   3:         ...
   4: import org.gridlab.gridsphere.portlet.service.spi.PortletServiceProvider;
   5: import org.gridlab.gridsphere.services.core.timer.TimerService;
   6: 
   7:         ...
   8:         while (timerIter.hasNext()) {
   9:             Timer timer = (Timer) timerIter.next();
  10:             timer.cancel();
  11:         ...
  12:         }
  13:         timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(task, delay, period);

View Full Code Here
   1: 
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5:       {
   6:          Timer t = new Timer();
   7:          Send10Notifies task = new Send10Notifies();
   8:         ...
   9:          t.scheduleAtFixedRate(task, 0, 1000);
  10:       }

View Full Code Here
   1:         MulticastWatcher mw = new MulticastWatcher(args);
   2:         Timer timer = new Timer(true);
   3:         ...
   4:         timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(mw, 1000, 1000);
   5:         mw.watch();
   6: 
   7:   }

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.util.Date;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5: 
   6:     private Timer daemon = null;
   7: 
   8:         ...
   9:         {
  10:             daemon = new Timer( true );
  11:         }
  12:         ...
  13: 
  14:         daemon.scheduleAtFixedRate( runnable, startTime, DAILY_INTERVAL );

View Full Code Here
   1: import java.util.StringTokenizer;
   2: import java.util.Timer;
   3: import java.util.TimerTask;
   4:         ...
   5:         try {
   6:               String timer = aConfigEntry.getProperty(AzureusConfigConstants.UPDATE_TIMER);
   7:         ...
   8:               StringTokenizer tokenizer = new StringTokenizer(timer, ":");
   9:               long hours = Long.valueOf(tokenizer.nextToken()).longValue();
  10:         ...
  11:       };
  12:       timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(task, aPeriod, aPeriod);

View Full Code Here